Should Christians seek to share the Gospel with Jewish people?

Of course they should, right?  What could be more obvious to believers?

Apparently it isn’t obvious to false teachers who write things like Can We Stop Trying To Evangelize Jews Now? (And make no mistake, most theological Liberals rationalize that we shouldn’t share the Good News with Jews.)

“I would argue that it inappropriate and deeply offensive for Christians to attempt to convert Jews or to misuse the Hebrew Scriptures and claim them as Christian writings.

- Rev. Chuck Currie

That’s odd, because Jesus tried to convert Jews, as did all the early Christians, including Paul. Should we listen to Chuck or to the early church and the Bible?

Does the apostate UCC and UMC, both served by Chuck, not include the Old Testament in their Bible? That’s what Chuck appears to be saying, but it is news to me. And I’ve seen Chuck (mis)quote the OT many times. I’m not sure why he is abandoning it now.

Paul was even willing to sacrifice his own salvation if it would save all the Jews:

Romans 9:1 I am speaking the truth in Christ–I am not lying; my conscience bears me witness in the Holy Spirit– 2 that I have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart. 3 For I could wish that I myself were accursed and cut off from Christ for the sake of my brothers, my kinsmen according to the flesh. 4 They are Israelites, and to them belong the adoption, the glory, the covenants, the giving of the law, the worship, and the promises. 5 To them belong the patriarchs, and from their race, according to the flesh, is the Christ who is God over all, blessed forever. Amen. 6 But it is not as though the word of God has failed. For not all who are descended from Israel belong to Israel, 7 and not all are children of Abraham because they are his offspring, but “Through Isaac shall your offspring be named.”

Romans 10: 1 Brothers, my heart’s desire and prayer to God for them is that they may be saved. 2 For I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge. 3 For, being ignorant of the righteousness of God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God’s righteousness. 4 For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.

Chuck and other false teachers go wrong when they let fallacious illustrations like this trump the Bible:

Could you honestly tell a Jewish child being forced into the fires of a concentration camp that they are doomed to the fires of hell because they don’t accept Jesus as their savior?

They stack the deck by using the vague term child.  If we take that out so that we don’t muddy the waters with age-of-accountability questions, the answer is simple: Yes, I could honestly tell a Jew that they are doomed to Hell if they don’t repent and believe.  What was so hard about that? That is what the Bible teaches over and over, such as John 8:24 (“I told you that you would die in your sins, for unless you believe that I am he you will die in your sins.”).  I realize that Chuck and the other false teachers sit in judgment of God and don’t like that truth, but it is still the truth.  Just because you die a tragic and unjust death doesn’t mean you weren’t a sinner in need of a Savior.  Only a non-believer could think that (allegedly) sparing someone a little angst about Hell right before they go there for eternity is some kind of good deed.

It is only in the perverse, God-hating world of theological Liberals that it is unkind to tell people how to avoid an eternity in Hell.

It is only the truly hateful, self-loving false teachers who would consciously deny the truth to people who desperately need it — Jews included.

7 thoughts on “Should Christians seek to share the Gospel with Jewish people?

  1. “I would argue that it inappropriate and deeply offensive for Christians to attempt to convert Jews or to misuse the Hebrew Scriptures and claim them as Christian writings.”

    So let me get this straight – it’s okay for us to witness to Muslims, atheists, Buddhists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Zorastrians, Sikhs, Hindus, agnostics, Mormons, followers of animist/”native” faiths and various eastern religions……but not Jews? Because a few thousand years ago, their spiritual forebears inhabited the modern-day nation of Israel, received what came to be known as the Mosaic Code (“the Law”) and otherwise had communion with God before the arrival of Jesus? That’s the reason we’re not supposed to love them, preach to them, or tell them that their rabbis have missed the boat and are making a mistake by continuing to wait for a Savior? What rubbish.

    Why would that be, exactly? What makes them any different from anyone else who doesn’t have Christ – just because they’ve heard of Him before and couldn’t accept what He told their people long ago? In fact, I’ve even heard of a ministry (“Jews for Jesus”) who not only won’t take this advice, they actually specifically target those who are ethnically or religiously Jewish and reach out to these people with Christ’s message. Most of them are themselves former Jews who accepted Christ because of this ministry. One of them came down and spoke at my church years ago, to discuss the specific challenges involved with doing that. I think he said that as a child, his parents went out of the way to tell him that this Jesus fellow was a fraud, but when he got older, he realized his family had lied to him.

    Could you honestly tell a Jewish child being forced into the fires of a concentration camp that they are doomed to the fires of hell because they don’t accept Jesus as their savior?

    I’m with Neil – I don’t see what being a kid or being locked in a Nazi concentration camp has to do with Jesus’ message of redemption for believers / damnation for non-believers. In fact, I remember being a teenager and my mother and I were watching some TV mini-series about Jewish people being rounded up during the Holocaust. It showed this young Jewish woman being paraded around with other Jews inside the walls of Dachau or something while a drunk SS officer tried to decide which ones he wanted to take as workers or sex slaves, and which ones would go directly to the gas chamber…and later in the series it shows the woman’s dad being gassed in a room packed with people screaming to get out.

    I remember thinking, “Those people really had it rough – mistreated in life and murdered by these thugs….then on to face judgment in the next world on top of it.”

  2. I think what’s missing from his (and way too many others) perspective is what’s found in Paul’s prayer: “My heart’s desire and prayer to God for them is that they may be saved.” That is, it’s not “They gotta straighten up and fly right” or “They are so messed up that I need to try to fix them”, but “I care enough about them to long to offer them hope in Christ.” When our message misses the primary motivation of love, it just comes across as “trying to convert”. Of course, it will almost always come across as “inappropriate and deeply offensive” because “the word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing.” And THAT begs the question: “Chuck, why is it folly to you?”

  3. I find this whole situation simultaneously amusing (it’s so obvious we should share the gospel with Jews, just as the first Christians did) and sad (that Mr. “Reverend” here can’t see that obvious truth).

So, what do you think?

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